Game Library

Need a group game for 30 kindergarteners, indoors, in a pinch? Trying to convince 5th grader boys to stop hogging the ball? We have you covered.

Explore hundreds of games by group size, available space and equipment, appropriate ages, and developmental skills. Our games are designed to keep all kids playing. You will see lots of games where everyone is “it”, ground-rules that keep games manageable for recess supervisors, skill-building variations on students’ favorite sports, and other adaptations that make games fun and inclusive for everyone.

  • Any Size

  • Grades 1-2

  • None

  • Under 10 minutes

  1. Indoor Game

Up, Down, Stop, Go ›

Take a brain break and challenge your students to a few rounds of Up, Down, Stop, Go. This is a great game to refocus your students’ minds and refresh their bodies after periods of sitting at their desk. Simple commands translate into simple movements. Challenge your students’ minds further by having them do the opposite…

  • Large Group (10 and up)

  • Grades 3-5

  • Volleyball Net

  • 10 minutes or more

Volleyball ›

  • Grades 3-5

  • No equipment needed

Wah! ›

  • Small Group (1-10)

  • Grades 1-2

  • Balls

  • Under 10 minutes

  1. Ball Games
  2. Recess Games

Wall Ball ›

  • Grades 3-5

  • No equipment needed

Wall Baseball ›

  • Pre K/K

  • Bouncy Balls

  1. Ball Games

Watch Out! ›

  • Large Group (10 and up)

  • Grades 1-2

  • None

  1. Recess Games
  2. Tag Games

Watch Your Back Tag ›

  • Large Group (10 and up)

  • Grades 1-2

  • None

  • Under 10 minutes

  1. Indoor Game
  2. Readiness Games

Weather Vane/Jump Whistle ›

  • Any Size

  • Grades 3-5

  • None

  • Under 10 minutes

  1. Autonomous/Self-access Games
  2. Indoor Game
  3. Rotational Games

What are you doing? ›

Imagination and creativity are the name of the game here. Allow a student to do whatever they want (appropriately) in front of the other students. As they perform their imaginary task, someone asks, “What are you doing?” Instead of explaining, the performer describes a new activity (that they are not doing) and the next child…