Reports

September 29, 2017

The Impact of a Recess-Based Leadership Program on Urban Elementary School Students ›

April 2017 William V Massey, Megan B Stellino, Meredith Whitley, Megan Wilkison Urban youth face more barriers to physical activity outside of the school day. Results from this study suggest that youth have the ability to be change makers in the school setting, influencing the school culture in positive ways by reducing bullying, role modelling…

September 29, 2017

Psychological Predictors of Children’s Recess Physical Activity Motivation and Behavior ›

Nov-12 Megan Babkes Stellino, Christina D Sinclair This study explored the relationship between children’s basic psychological needs satisfaction at recess, level of recess physical activity motivation (RPAM), and recess physical activity (RPA). The study relies on basic needs theory (BNT), which suggests that the extent to which an individual is intrinsically motivated depends on satisfaction…

September 29, 2017

Impact of Recess Interventions on Children’s Physical Activity- A Meta Analysis ›

Jan-14 Heather E Erwin PhD, Melinda Ickes PhD, Soyeon Ahn PhD, Alicia Fedewa PhD Limited evidence suggests recess interventions can improve youth physical activity levels, even when controlling for other variables. According to this meta analysis, playtime/recess can contribute between 5% and 40% of children recommended physical activity. As children got older, the effects of…

September 29, 2017

Strategies for Recess in Schools ›

In Jan 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and SHAPE America released new guidance documents that provide schools with: Nineteen evidence-based strategies for recess A planning guide A template to help develop a written recess plan that integrates these strategies The SHAPE/CDC Recess Guidelines recommend that in designing an effective strategy for recess, schools…

September 29, 2017

Physical Activity and Positive Youth Development: Impact of a School-Based Program ›

Aug-11 Madsen, KA. Hicks, K. Thompson, H. After one year of exposure to Playworks, students showed statistically significant increases in the following four protective factors as compared to students with no exposure to Playworks: (1) Physical Activity, (2) Problem-Solving Skills, (3) Meaningful Participation in School (4) Goals and Aspirations. With each additional year of Playworks…

September 29, 2017

“Findings from an Experimental Evaluation of Playworks: Effects on Play, Physical Activity and Recess” ›

May-13 Nicholas Beyler, Martha Bleeker, Susanne James-Burdumy, Jane Fortson, Rebecca A. London, Lisa Westrich, Katie Stokes-Guinan, and Sebastian Castrechini Accelerometer data showed that Playworks had a positive impact on students’ physical activity during recess. Students in treatment schools engaged in physical activity during recess that was, on average, more intense than the physical activity engaged…

September 29, 2017

“Impact and Implementation Findings from an Experimental Evaluation of Playworks: Effects on School Climate, Academic Learning, Student Social Skills and Behavior” ›

May-13 Jane Fortson, Susanne James-Burdumy, Martha Bleeker, Nicholas Beyler, Rebecca A London, Lisa Westrich, Katie Stokes-Guinan, Sebastian Castrechini Teachers in treatment schools reported less bullying and exclusionary behavior than teachers in control schools. There was a positive impact of Playworks on teachers’ reports of students using positive, encouraging language; teachers’ perceptions of the extent to…

September 29, 2017

Playing Fair: The Contribution of High-Functioning Recess to Overall School Climate in Low-Income Elementary Schools ›

Jan-15 Rebecca A London PhD, Lisa Westrich MSW, Katie Stokes-Guinan PhD, Milbrey McLaughlin PhD In schools that achieved a high functioning recess, teachers and principals agreed that by the end of the year, recess offered more opportunities for student engagement, conflict resolution, pro-social skill development, and emotional and physical safety. Respondents linked these changes to…

September 29, 2017

The Impact of Playworks on Students’ Physical Activity by Race/Ethnicity: Findings from a Randomized Controlled Trial ›

Mar-16 Susanne James-Burdumy, Nicholas Beyler, Kelley Borradaile, Martha Bleeker, Jane Fortson, Alyssa Maccarone Non-Hispanic black students at Playworks schools had higher average number of steps taken per minute and spent more time in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Compared to non-Hispanic black students in control schools, non-Hispanic black students in Playworks schools recorded 338…